Step by Step Journey: Writings of Richard Dahlstrom - because there's always a next step

While the world goes mad, Four Things We KNOW

Mourning at a stadium in San Bernadino

Behind the holiday lights, both here in Europe and back home in the USA, the waves of unhappy news just keep coming.  Colorado Springs.  Beirut.  Paris.  Mumbai.  San Bernadino – death dealing violence has become so common its hardly news anymore.

In such times, the events themselves are never the only stressors.  There are reactions to the events, or the proposed reactions by politicians and wanna-be presidents that cause reaction too, and then, because we’re all connected, there are our responses to each other’s responses.  Gun control or conceal and carry?  Religious profiling or open borders?  Boots on the ground?  Drones in the air?  Leave them alone?

These are our debates, and as we’re having them, they usually aren’t pretty.   The uncivil dialogue creates yet another stress, as we become ‘houses divided’ even in communities of Christ followers.  How good people land on such profoundly different sides on these conversations is a topic for another day.  For this day though, I’d suggest that the most important thing Christ followers can do as they seek to form their own convictions on these matters is to make certain that our convictions are formed by things we know with a great deal of clarity from our Bibles.   Jesus hasn’t ruled directly whether a ban on assault weapons is a good or bad idea.   He didn’t go into detail on what Rome’s immigration policy should be in the 1st century  But he wasn’t silent either.  Jesus taught us stuff, and it’s the stuff we know that should be our starting point in framing our ethics:

What DO we know?

1.  We shouldn’t be motivated by fear

The west is bathed in fear right now, and the fear is giving birth to all kinds of unhealthy responses, ranging from pre-emptive violence against immigrants to amassing weapons and ammo to protect ourselves and our stuff, to blanket condemnations of entire people groups.

It’s important to see that throughout the Bible, if the motive behind our actions is fear, our actions are likely wrong.   When the Lord speaks to Joseph about the unexpected pregnancy of his fiance, God tells him to ‘fear not’, and this means he must overcome the natural fear of social consequences and fear of what other people think.  The same message to “fear not” comes to Mary, and then later to the shepherds.  Everyone is called to simply “do the right thing” and then trust that the consequences of such actions will be in God’s hands.

The problem with fear is that it leads to reactionary responses and often escalates cycles of violence needlessly, and this is the reason we should make certain we’ve slain the fear in our hearts before choosing our course of action, or even making our vote.  Fear’s a seductive mistress, often bathed in the rhetoric of patriotism and/or faith, but when stripped to core, it’s still just fear.

2. We’re called to be people of justice

While it’s true that embodying the character of Jesus means turning the other cheek, loving our enemies, and laying down our lives for one another, it’s also true that Jesus has a heart for the unjustly oppressed, the downtrodden, and victims of violence whether in Paris or in Syria.

When my pacifist friends tell me that Jesus calls us to lay down our lives, I wholeheartedly agree.  What makes our world tricky is the question of how I’m to respond when the lives of others are at stake; my children, my wife, my Muslim or Christian neighbor, innocents celebrating a birthday in a Paris cafe, or gathering for a work party in Santa Monica, the teenage girl sexually enslaved in Asia or Los Angeles due to greed – what should Jesus do here?    Maybe more than tweets and prayers.

What does the Lord require of us?  Do justice!  And then he leaves it to us to figure out what that means.  The thing he makes clear is that the justice for which we’re to work is that of others first, more than justice for ourselves.

3. We’re called to be people of mercy

There’s a story in Genesis about Abraham bargaining with God over the fate of Sodom and God tells Abraham that he will spare an entire city that’s filled with unjust people for the sake of 10 who are righteous.

It seems our conversations these days have become the exact opposite of that.  We’re willing to vilify, label, and exclude an entire religious group because of the risk that some few among them might be zealots intent on doing harm.  We’ll judge the whole because of the risk of a part being hurtful.  Is this mercy?

4.   Words matter

Jesus said that by our words we’ll be justified and by our words we’ll be condemned, and then the Apostle Paul followed up on this by twice calling us to watch our language.  When we lose civility in our conversations, we also lose credibility.  This isn’t to say we should be anything less than honest, forthright, and courageous in what we say.  It simply means that the way we say things matters as much as what we say.

Here at the end of this post, I’ve not addressed ethical and political specifics.  It’s not because these don’t matter.  However before there are ethics, there are motives and priorities which shape those ethics.  And now, more than ever, is a time when we need the wisdom of Christ at the core, at the level of motives and priorities.

The Prince of Peace has come.  God with us!  But more, he’s calling us come to each other in exactly the same way he came to us.  May we search our hearts and motives this Advent, to the end that the words of our mouths and the actions of our hands  will have their origin in Christ himself.

 

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