Step by Step Journey: Writings of Richard Dahlstrom - because there's always a next step

20 Years Our Home… and a time for everything

It was just over a year ago that my mom-in-law came to visit, and some health matters made it clear it would be best for her to stay with us.  This set in motion a series of events that led to my wife and I moving east of Seattle a bit, up into the mountains, where we’d planned to move eventually anyway.  The self contained apartment has become my mom-in-law’s home, and she’s pure delight to have with us.  We’ve rented a tiny place next to the church in the city so I can skip horrific commutes and be “down” (as we say at the pass) on a regular basis,  but selling our “big house” was the obvious next step.  My lovely wife’s been preparing it for market with paint and care this past week.  Of course, each brush stroke brought memories.  Here are her thoughts….

Little HouseYes, these walls can talk.  As I find myself sitting on the hardwood floor with mahogany inlay, painting the baseboards of my Greenlake house in Seattle, I’m hearing the sounds of Legos being spilled out, the vacuum cleaner chasing dust bunnies, tap dancing on the indestructible 1920’s kitchen flooring, violins and piano echoing off the lathe & plaster walls, drums pulsing from the basement, thumps from the climbing wall in the attic.  As we prepare to sell our home of the past twenty years, the flood of memories is at times overwhelming.  I always said that this little house had “good bones” but my family have been the ones who have fleshed it out and given it life for these past two decades, coming and going, filling it with laughter and joy and questions and tears and decisions and major life events of every kind, mostly documented in photos at the front door before heading out on another adventure.

We found the house on a Sunday in December 1995, the FOR SALE sign having been put out the night before.  Richard turned one street too early for the café he was headed that morning but that “wrong turn” led him past the house that was to become our home later that day.  We made an offer an hour after seeing it and moved in within a month.  It was a house like no other we had lived in; hard wood floors, white plaster walls, tiny kitchen, treeless back yard, neighbors within hearing distance on all sides.  Over time, we learned to lower our indoor voices and wash dishes by hand.  We planted trees in the yard that grew into our own forest retreat and discovered many, many special friends in the surrounding houses.

Around year five, I ventured into adding color to the walls and have since painted every room and hallway in the house.  And they’re not neutral colors.  Most are bold and bright.  They’re not of the same color palette so they may be puzzling to potential buyers or new owners.  But for me, the matriarch of this home, they are telling me story after story of the inhabitants of each room.  I know, that under this freshly painted “guest room” in the basement, there are lovely blue walls with fluffy white clouds near the ceiling, carefully sponged on by our oldest daughter in her room where she filled journals with creative stories.  The bright yellow room on the main floor has always been bright yellow, just like our bouncy youngest daughter who covered most of the walls with drama production posters and pictures with friends (hence needing to be repainted once we peeled the paint with each removal.)  The dark forest green room belonged to our equally artistic son who choose to glue his excellent black and white photography masterpieces to the walls (in addition to a pastel mural drawn on one wall that never quite washed off as expected) but fresh paint repaired all that.

The Paprika red basement family room housed many late night slumber parties and “Basement Club” meals and movie events as well as hundreds of college students who found their way to our house for the Final Four Basketball Championships for several years.  The bright green living room-turned dining room hosted our oldest daughter’s wedding rehearsal dinner, hearing stories of how this group of thirty people happened to gather from all around the world to celebrate this special event.  Birthday parties, holiday meals, ordinary meals, small group gatherings, meetings of many sorts, fill the dining room with stories.  I’ll always remember my mother-in-law sitting for hours at the front window, reporting on all the comings and goings of the neighbors or my dad who was the last one to bring order to my workbench in the garage, many years ago.

The attic was what sold us on the house twenty years ago.  The top floor became our master bedroom, our place of intimacy and “retreat” after long days.  The same friend who built our indoor climbing wall also paneled the ceiling in knotty pine to match our log bed that was clamored upon every Christmas morning by our three children, no matter how old they became.  We hung an Austrian cow bell on the front door to alert us when the kids came home and I’ll never forget the sound of the door opening to the stairwell while waiting for them to come up and check in.  Sometimes there were long conversations, perched at the foot of the bed, about the event from which they had just returned and sometimes it was just a kiss goodnight, but always, a feeling of relief that they were home, safe and sound.

photo(2)And then there is the kitchen.  It was a difficult adjustment when we moved in, being about one third the size of my former kitchen.  It has a smaller than average refrigerator and no automatic dishwasher and yet I’m proud to say that I managed to raise three very responsible adults from this kitchen.  I’m fairly confident that potential buyers will see my woefully ill-equipped kitchen as a liability, but they will be mistaken.  I think our step-saver kitchen has been our greatest asset.  It taught us all to be creative.  It taught me contentment.  It always became the gathering place for conversation while chopping vegetables or stirring at the stove or scooting someone aside to open the oven door.  And I’ve also discovered that there is something magical about soapy dishwater, lending itself to camaraderie and honest conversation.  Yes, it’s an old-fashioned kitchen with old-fashioned values but the cabinets have a fresh coat of paint and shiny new knobs that may very well get pulled out by new owners, but they served our family well and the many guests whom we were privileged to host.

I know it’s silly to get sentimental about a house, but I’m going to just let the tears flow and pray that the next family is blessed by the stories imbedded in these walls.  Thank you, sturdy little house, for protecting us from storms, within and without, for rooting us deeply in this neighborhood and in this city, and for filling our lives with tremendous memories.  May the next occupants be sheltered well by your walls, making our sturdy little house a home once again.  

 

2 Comments

  1. Carol

    June 3, 2015 at 4:34 pm

    Wow, Donna, that was so sweet. What memories. I was almost crying at the end too. What a tribute to a house that truly became a home.

    Reply
  2. Karen Renfroe-Gielgens

    June 3, 2015 at 4:56 pm

    Thank you for this beautifully written entry. We are coming close to a similar situation in our lives and you gave words to my deep heartfelt feelings and thoughts. May God bless you all in these next chapters of your lives. I will pray that the Lord guides the right family to make that left turn and find their next home.

    Reply

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